Setting Your Goals – Yes, We Know It’s July

An important part of setting goals is figuring out how to know they are complete.  Although this is a topic typically reserved for December or January, July is actually a great time to talk about goal setting because your 2011 goals are old enough to evaluate, but still new enough to be accomplished.  Here are 4 methods for measuring goals that should be considered as you are refining for 2011 and moving into initial planning for 2012.

The Go, No-Go Goal Measurement

When I was in telecommunications sales, a common annual objective was to get products lab tested and approved for sale into major accounts.  Customers would provide a lab approval notice that gave the go, no-go for the “lab approval” objective.  The good thing about these types of goals is that they are very easy to measure, it’s either done or not done.

However, there is a down side, especially when using it for performance payment. Sometimes your goal becomes impossible a few months into the year – losing a specific RFP or landing a specific client, and at that point you have a goal with no hope of accomplishment.  It’s ok to have one or two of these, but be careful not to have a bunch of goals that are impossible by the fourth month of the year.

The Simple Goal Measure

Revenue is a great simple measure, as is profitability.  These are things that are already being measured and typically have a history of performance so that a realistic number can be set for achievement.  If you can set goals for things you already measure that also accomplish the things you want, it’s a great goal.  But many times, you want to accomplish things that aren’t already being measured….

The Not-So-Simple Goal Measure

Many times you want to set goals on things like customer satisfaction and brand awareness, things that are measurable, but ones that you probably aren’t currently measuring.  It might be a new goal that just needs to be set up for measurement or one that previously escaped your means to pay for measurement.  Many times it helps to figure out a cheaper and easier way to measure something indirectly. Using a well designed web site and Google Analytics can go a long way in measuring certain results, especially things like advertising effectiveness.

Subjective Goal Measurement

Once, I was interviewing a new client, a restaurant owner, and asked how they measured a successful day.  I was looking for a revenue number or even a number of customers, but they looked me in the eye and said, “It just feels like everything is going well.  Customers seem happy, the orders are moving and the wait staff is smiling.”  In the end there are some things we want to accomplish that either can’t be measured or we can’t afford to measure them and that’s ok.  Just make sure you realize the shortcoming and do the best you can.

In the case of the restaurant, I definitely recommended they use daily revenue as a measure they were already tracking.  But I also told them to count the number of days that things “felt good”, or even rate the good feeling on a scale of 1 to 5, and we could use that as a starting point.  Sigma College of Small Business helps small and medium businesses with their business strategies and planning, including setting up goal measurements for the things that you just want to get done.

Tell Us – What is the biggest obstacle you face in setting and reaching goals!

Social Media Marketing Starts with “Networking”

Recently, I had the opportunity to present a Career Building event at Strayer University in Manassas, VA.  My friend Amelia Stansell, a VP with BB&T, joined me in presenting a topic on professional networking and using social media to leverage your network.  My next few posts will work through that presentation, highlighting Amelia’s principles for networking and then relating those principles to techniques for social media marketing.

Thanks to Jennifer Durand at Strayer University for inviting us to speak and to the students who participated with some great comments and questions!

The Enigma We Call “Networking”

Amelia begins her presentation by defining the enigma we call networking as “person to person relationship marketing.  She emphasizes that it is taking the time with each individual to know them as a person and build a relationship.  It’s these relationships that can help lead to either closing a sale with that person or getting a referral from them.
Social Media is a new technology that leverages proven networking techniques.  The resulting value is that you can grow and manage a much larger network.  Use tools like Facebook and LinkedIn to follow the lives and careers of your network, interact with them through posts and comments, and refer them through sharing and recommendations.  These methods make it easier to interact with each person in your network between the meetings and phone calls.  Try it and notice how your face-to-face conversations change from “how have you been” to “did your son get off to college ok?”.  It’s a much deeper start to what will be a more productive conversation.

It’s About Getting More Referrals

Professional networkers will tell you that it’s all about the referral because it is more likely that you will get new business from a referral by your network than directly with someone in your network.  Therefore, it’s important that your network trusts you, sees you as an expert and understands your business enough to recognize situations where they can make the referral.  In traditional networking the process begins with the “elevator pitch” and initial meeting, then continues with follow-up meetings, networking groups, phone calls and promotional materials.

Social Media leverages these techniques by enabling you to post your basic information in online “profiles” and “info” pages.  These provide the base background information about you and your business.  Build trust and credibility online is a continual process of listening to your network by reading their posts, interacting with comments and questions, and consistently posting valuable and informative content for your audience.

Relationship Selling, Not Broadcast Advertising

Many business people approach their social media marketing as a broadcast advertising channel, a free way to reach more people with their message.  For some businesses that have a huge fan base, it can certainly be used in that way.  However, for most of us who count on sales through personal relationships and word-of-mouth, the approach needs to mirror solid networking techniques more than basic advertising principles.

Sigma College of Small Business Social Media Services help customers use Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Blogging to promote their business and themselves.

What are some tips and recommendations that you have for how to leverage social media to build your professional network?